MEDWAY, MA — The Cybex Arc Trainer's 10th utility patent, for the product's “unique function,” demonstrates that it is creating a new equipment category, according to Cybex.

No change was made to the Arc Trainer based on this patent, according to Kevin Satz, Cybex public relations specialist, but the patent is an official, legal recognition of the unique characteristics of this device in comparison to other ellipticals or cross trainers on the market.

“Cybex views this as the latest step in the Arc Trainer creating a completely new equipment category that has been shown through independent studies to offer a significantly superior workout,” he says.

Cybex notes that the Arc Trainer's design lets users meet personal strength, power, endurance, cardio and weight-loss goals more effectively in less time. The machine's versatility includes a broad incline and resistance range, consistency in proper positioning and superior biomechanics.

The Arc Trainer is the only fitness equipment to feature an adaptive power training mode, the company says, which means that the faster a user goes, the more resistance is encountered. The product also offers patent-pending, same-side forward technology, a motion in which the arm and leg on the same side move together. This allows users to vary the workout intensity between their upper and lower bodies.

The technology also increases the ergonomic relationship between arms and legs during the range of incline adjustment.

CYBEX also recently rebranded its research arm as the CYBEX Institute for Exercise Science with the continued mission of disseminating scientifically accurate information applicable to the disciplines of general fitness, sports performance and clinical medicine. Under the guidance of Executive Director Paul M. Juris, the entity formerly known as the CYBEX Institute will continue to partner with exercise research-oriented universities, hospitals and sports performance organizations nationwide, exploring areas such as cardiac health, obesity, orthopedic impact, and sports and human performance.
Stephanie Bloyd